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Wii Love Physics

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How can you not love physics?

Wii Love Physics has two main components.  Part 1 has students writing original word problems based on what they are seeing in the game.  The Mario and Sonic Olympics game is great for this as you can use metric measurements with your students.  You can see a sample of this activity on the side. I have students trade problems and attempt to solve one anothers word problems.
 
 
Part 2 of the lesson uses the Wii Sports game that comes with your Wii console.  Students use the home run derby to analyze the motion of a baseball.  To get to the home run derby, go to training mode and hit baseball - you'll get the homerun derby from there.

      I have noticed that students have difficulty with reading comprehension when it comes to solving physics problems.  Students have the math skills but have great difficulty setting the problems and using the equation to complete the operation. Using the Wii, I developed a way to make the world problems more fun and engaging. By writing the problems on their own, students begin to see how world problems are broken down and are more successful completing them during later units.

Get ready for some baseball!

     This activity can be used as a stand alone lesson or a part of something bigger (see Project Surf).  You can also adapt it to the bowling or tennis game depending on how many students are playing and how quickly you want to cycle students through.
      When selecting students to play video games, I make sure that all students have gone once before selecting students for a second time,  I keep track so that every student gets an equal opportunity to play.  There are times when some students will pass on their turn to play and that is fine - I make sure that they get a few turns at some point during the school year.

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Using Nintento Wii and other video game systems to engage students in Science.